Lucasville prison uprising

Greg needs a fair trial – please donate to get him one!

We are crowdfunding for a fair impartial hearing for Greg Curry, who was wrongfully accused & sentenced in Ohio following a 1993 prison riot in which he did not take part at all. Greg seeks your help, the help from people who care to see justice for all!

Please donate:

There are currently two ways you can donate:

1) Paypal Pool for Greg Curry Legal Trustfund

A personal Paypal-pool that can be shared, all money that is donated goes towards the set goal.

2) Crowdfunder: https://fundrazr.com/GregCurryLegalFund?ref=ab_7nAtlw0CXOA7nAtlw0CXOA

Most of the money donated goes to the goal, about 5% is taken for money transfers and the crowdfunding platform.

Greg Curry’s cause is pure and simple justice: a fair, impartial hearing which is long overdue.


The money we raise will be used for investigative work and legal representation by an attorney.

The expenses, the filing decisions will all be posted.

The fund is being held in a Trust-account.

Why?
Numerous times Greg attempted to receive justice by filing pro-se motions with help of jailhouse lawyers. The proper judicial arguments are present in his case, but those legalities must be brought before the Court by an experienced attorney.

This is why Greg seeks your help, the help from the people who care to see justice-for-all be a reality for all.

What is needed?
Large or small donations all help, as well as recommending to others you know to make a donation, or when attorneys and/or Innocence Projects donate their time.

Contact

Annabelle Parker is fundraising for Greg Curry, with the help of Mosi Paki.

Contact us via email at: Freegregcurry@gmail.com, or visit and contact the Facebook profile for Greg. Or DirectMail us on Twitter (plz be patient if you do not directly receive a response!)

Reaching Out
My name is Mosi. In 1993, myself and hundreds of others caught up in the S.O.C.F. siege/riot unjustly received criminal and/or prison-convictions based on lies from those involved in the crimes.

As a result I was forced to do 25 years incarceration of which 18 years in isolated confinement, and I was released on the max. release date in November of 2013 to freer society.

As a truck driver, married, with 8 grandchildren, I’ll never forget my innocent good brothers still incarcerated. I’ve been a voice for these men.

To assist Greg Curry’s Legal Fund is another way to assist an innocent brother. It would be great if other ex-felons and others would reach out to help someone to help themselves in their fight for freedom.

Mosi Paki, August 25th, 2018

Please donate via:

1) Paypal Pool for Greg Curry Legal Trustfund

2) Crowdfunder: https://fundrazr.com/GregCurryLegalFund?ref=ab_7nAtlw0CXOA7nAtlw0CXOA

THANK YOU!

 

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Greg speaks on the commemoration of Lucasville 25 years – and the transfer that did not happen

Greg Curry speaks on having to stay in Ohio State Penitentiary for at least 1 1/2 years more, because he was tricked into believing he was going to transfer, and the importance of fundraising for his release as an innocently convicted person.

In April of 2018 it will be 25 years ago that a disturbance or riot, caused by inhumane, extremely strict dictatorial management at the Lucasville prison in Ohio led to the murder of 10 people, and the construction of the supermaximum security prison in Youngstown. Those convicted were not the actual perpetrators or murderers, but people who refused to snitch for a deal with the prosecutors or investigators, and some of them had been negotiators between the factions that were united during the riot.

Greg was not involved with any gang, and the causes of the uprising were not his focus, instead, he had been concentrating on his release that was not far away. And yet, he was indicted because he did not want to make a deal about something he had no responsibility in.

During the trial, snitch testimony was used to get him convicted. 25 years later, Greg and others who did not murder or hurt anyone, are still in prison with life sentences or the death penalty. This is injustice! Ohio must step up its conscience and stop this wrongful incarceration now!
Recorded on March 2nd, 2018.
Gregcurry.org

Greg Curry announces upcoming Transfer and Fundraiser

Greg recently sent us a video, recorded via Jpay, in which he announces our upcoming Fundraiser for his case of innocence. It is high time we found a dedicated lawyer, whom we have to pay, who is willing to fight for Greg, in order to overturn the wrongful conviction in the courts.

The Lucasville prison riot (or uprising or disturbance) of 1993 resulted not only in the death of prisoners and staff, but also in false arrests, indictions, and the use by the prosecution of state snitches, used to convict 5 people to death (the spokespeople who tried to intervene, not the actual people who did the killings!!) and at least 4 received a life sentence. One of them is Greg Curry, who at the time was not involved with any of the riots, but a snitch was instructed to get a conviction on Greg.

It is high time that these false convictions are overturned!! Let’s do it.

 

Text:

Greg Curry, November 12th, 2017:

Hello there everyone, this is my website that has supported me over the years.

It looks like this time is coming to an end: I’ll be transferred to a different prison.

So I just want to say thank you all for your support, and I’m gonna need yoru continued support as we build this legal defense fund, and the details of that is coming soon.

Thank you. Solidarity with all of you struggling for freedom and justice.

Freedom First!

Greg Curry on BlockReportRadio

Greg on BlockReportRadioToday August 12th BlockReport Radio published this internetcast with an interview with Greg Curry and JR:

https://soundcloud.com/blockreportradio/ohio-prisoner-greg-curry-speaks-on-september-9th-natl-prison-strike

Greg speaks about the Lucasville Prison uprising, supermax prisons and solitary confinement, and the September 9th National Prison Work Strike.

This was published on the SF Bay View website:

Lucasville Rebellion Survivor Greg Curry speaks with BlockReportRadio.com about the September 9th National Prison Strike, his comrade Imam Saddique Hasan being placed in the hole by the Ohio prison authorities to disrupt his part in organizing the national prison strike, and the personal plight of prisoner Greg Curry.
Greg-Curry-croppedTune in for more at BlockReportRadio.com. Free’Em All!

This interview was recorded for BlockReportRadio.com by The People’s Minister of Information JR Valrey. Valrey is the author of a number of books including the upcoming “Halfway to a Hundred: Dispatches From the Black Panther Party.” Tune in for more at BlockReportRadio.com

Injustice continues 23 years after the Lucasville prison uprising – April 11-22nd, 1993 – interview with Greg Curry about the Aftermath

Greg Curry, interviewed by Kunta Kenyatta

Introduction by Annabelle Parker:

This week we commemorate the 23rd year passing after the Lucasville prison uprising / riot / disturbance (April 11-22nd, 1993). Nine prisoners and one officer were killed during the 11-day uprising, which ended in a 21-point agreement, brokered by a few prisoners who showed great responsibility in keeping control and order. They would later be indicted and charged and convicted, to receive death penalties. Many innocent prisoners were indicted because they refused to be used as informants for the state.

This tragedy is still making victims, by still keeping at least 9 people locked up who have always proclaimed their innocence. Five of these are on death row: Keith Lamar, Siddique Abdullah Hasan, Jason Robb, George Skatzes and Namir Mateen (James Were).

In the words of Greg, Derek, Eric, Rasheed of OurFight4Justice.wordpress.com:

We encourage you to lend your hearts and ears to the true account of how lies and corruption lead to the conviction of innocent men during the 1993 Lucasville riot. The men were singled out and used as scapegoats because they would not lie and take part in the department of rehabilitation and corrections (DRC) broader political scheme to bilk the Ohio tax payers out of money and persuade the state to use this money for a supermax prison.

This is an interview with Greg Curry by former fellow prisoner and successfully re-entered prisoner advocate Kunta Kenyatta:

Kunta: I understand you’re indicted on two counts of aggravated murder in a major prison riot?

Greg: Yes. On April 11th, 1993 at the maximum security prison in Lucasville Ohio a riot took place. At its conclusion I was indicted on two aggravated murders for the deaths of two prisoners during the riot. At trial I was found guilty of one, and given 20 to life on the other. By chance I (not a lawyer/judge/prosecutor) was able to discover by conversation that someone else had already plead guilty to murdering this victim by himself under circumstances and location far different from that which the prosecutor was accusing me of. So I told my lawyer and strategically the lawyer failed me by telling the court, which just switched the charge, correcting a reversible appellant error, from aggravated murder to attempted aggravated murder. I received 15 to 25 yrs. After I do 20 to life consecutively.

Kunta: Did you bring in a paid attorney?

Greg: No, I couldn’t afford legal counsel and I don’t believe in burdening my family even if by chance they were willing to take on such debt. I also felt in no way I could have been found guilty when I was never inside the prison block once the uprising began.

Kunta: What do you hope to accomplish by risking an open interview?

Greg: I don’t see it as a risk first of all. To imply risk would be to assume I have something to hide. I’m doing interviews, passing out flyers, requesting law schools and firms help at all forms where injustice is the topic. Also I direct people to a website (Ourfight4innocence.wordpress.com) that gives the complete and official account of my claim of innocence. I believe once people know, their their heart will require an involved response.

Kunta: What keeps you trying to prove your innocence?

Greg: Actually I grew frustrated at the transparency of the backwood justice and policies. I tried not to think about the injustices but my children need me home. I owe it to them to get there, my parents are getting older and I’m innocent [note: Greg’s father has since this interview passed away].

Kunta: What legal issues do you have should a court accept this case?

Greg: I have multiple issue ranging from ineffective counsel on trial and direct appeal, prosecutor misconduct, such as hiding and refusing to turn over all discoverable material including at least 100 exculpatory statements that clearly point to others as the perpetrators.

In Ohio it is illegal for prosecutors to deny deals or purchased testimony at trial, it is also illegal for prosecutors to not correct any lies known to be untrue. In the following cases the courts speak with one voice: new trials must be granted for this behavior:

– Beckett v. Haviland 76 Fed appx.726; 2003 U.S. App. 6th Cir. [https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B5J4ss3ukvm1enR0bzFPYm9GQTg/edit ]

– Napue v. Illinois 360 U.S. 264 (1959), 269-71 U.S. Supreme Court [https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/360/264/]

– Wesener v. Straub 110 Fed. Appx. 618, 625 (6th Cir. 2004) (see: Napue Nightmares: Perjured Testimony in Trials Following the 1993 Lucasville, Ohio, Prison Uprising, Staughton Lynd, in: Capital University Law Review 36 (2008): pp. 559-634 [linked to on http://publicdefender.mt.gov/training/09/Annual09/LyndLawReview.pdf ].

My defense was largely based on “a bunch of paid liars saying anything to get out of charges and prison.” All the witnesses and both the prosecutors swore every sentence that there were no deals given in front of my jury under oath.
Members of my jury requested to know, because that would matter in their decision-making.

On direct appeal, the same two prosecutors admitted they gave my star witnesses a deal (a parole to a convicted murder[er] who admits to being part of a “death squad” in the riot, with no new charge).

This information is on the website using court documents not speculation. See for yourself at Ourfight4justice.wordpress.com.

Kunta: What proof of your innocence do you have?

Greg: I was never inside. I had at court many non-riot-related prisoners as witnesses and one staff-member who was my job supervisor, testifying to my whereabouts. No officer or people without something to gain accused me. Since my convictions I’ve gathered many police statements stating prisoners accused others of these crimes, but the prosecutors hid them until after my trial so that my name couldn’t be cleared.

Kunta: If there was no officer present or in control, how does the State go about sorting out personal vendettas and otherwise “he said/she said”?

Greg: This question is at the heart of these convictions. It was said many times by those investigators: you help us or you become a target. I knew nothing so I couldn’t help. When you read the investigators’ statements you will see at first a person knew nothing, then he knows everything as if he was reading a script, and when he knows everything, the recorder happens to be on, and the hint of favors begin to enter the picture on tape and / or in the statements. You can read people being “guided” along. Some witnesses even admit they didn’t like me. It was all about convictions, getting people convicted.

Kunta: Briefly give me an idea of the area where the prison is, the court location and how that may have a effected a fair trial?

Greg: The prison is in Southern Ohio in the hills connected to Kentucky and West Virginia. Very rural European-dominated area by far. The prison is the driving force to the economic stability. The courthouse sits right in the center of town about 15 minutes from the prison in a place called Portsmouth; racial tension is historic in that area, especially in that prison. Just a few years before the riot a white female prison teacher was killed by a black prisoner; that never sat well and the wound was burst wide open on April 11, 1993.

Of the 50 or so indictments, over 40 were against black prisoners. The white officers mostly refused to testify on the “Aryan” prisoners. Of course the jury pool was all European.

Kunta: Why in your opinion hasn’t the judicial system worked for you?

Greg: The judicial system is meant to work for its founding fathers’ offspring and it mostly does work for them. In that climate at that time it would have been a riot in the streets had I won the case. From lack of funding, lack of investigation, court decisions, prosecutors’ behavior, jurors’ frame of mind, etc. I didn’t have a chance, and since the appeals process reviews only the trial record, the lawyer must put something on record, and his ability was limited, assuming his heart was sincere. We want to believe that about everyone.

The Columbus Public Defenders Office requested I send all my legal work to them for possible post-conviction. During the direct appeal process I sent it in. They sat on it 8 days before my time would expire, then they turned over 1,000 pages of material and said “your time is almost up, rush something to the courts” (yeah) and I know nothing of the law, but I did what I could. I tried to explain to the courts what happened and to please allow me more time. I never got a response, but I did as soon as possible put my best effort before them, again to date never receiving a response.

On direct appeal everything was “harmless error” or a non-issue. Remember this is a major event in Ohio and I’m dealing with Ohio courts, judges, prosecutors, and court-appointed lawyers who receive their pay from the same source.

I actually filed more motions than my appointed lawyer to start a double murder trial in a highly inflammatory environment that – by the way – he grew up in; also his office is right across the street from the courthouse. It was April 1996, I sent my post conviction material and all legal work to the Columbus Public Defenders Office. They held it until September 13, 1996: 8 days before the deadline.

Kunta: Do you know any of the victims’ witnesses for the State, or other accused?

Greg: No, I don’t know either of the people I am accused of killing and thus never knew their background or character. A few of the witnesses for the State (my accusers) I did know casually, none intimately that we were of shared thought or ideals. I know a few of the people also indicted for murder, of course I know them all now. I also knew my parents and sons, who are also victims of this false conviction.

Kunta: Why you?

Greg: The climate was convictions, and so I was a magnet for treatment others didn’t face. I fit once they decided my good friend was a satisfactory fit, his partners would be the natural targets.

In prison it’s a common procedure: if anyone gets in trouble, the administration will ask who he runs with? Go get them! Prisoner-on-prisoner incidents happen the same way: you fall out with one, you fall out with both or have to assume as much. Everyone has a partner and so it’s easy to clean up a bad situation by taking out partners, plus the person telling knows or again assumes “I can’t take one down without taking them both, or I put myself at risk,” and this was a serious risk.

Kunta: if I’m a law-abiding citizen that believes our judicial system works and is always honest in its pursuit of justice, what can you point to in the record of the contrary?

Greg: I repeat: please visit Ourfight4justice.wordpress.com, and look at the court documents that can be provided additionally. This isn’t “he said, she said,” it is official; I’ve given the prevailing case law. The law is clear, the documents are real, and so I expect the ideal that the judicial system works, but please verify. Realism over idealism. Each of you can become active to make your government work for all the people in all situations.

Kunta: How many people were charged with the same crime?

Greg: No less than five, and then we were all tried separately as if they (we) were the principal offender. Yes, all were found guilty.

Kunta: I understand that the community signed a petition asking for the death penalty and other punitive measures against prisoners before indictments or trials, and many of them [the signers of this petition] sat on jury trials?

Greg: Your facts are correct. It appears that at least two of them judged me. This wasn’t discovered until 2006 [see: https://justiceforlucasvilleprisoners.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/petitionsalynd.pdf ]. I couldn’t have known at trial. One would think a trial lawyer from there should know…

Postscript by Annabelle:

The latest update on Greg’s case is that he had filed a motion to the courts “to be heard,” and the court ruled that he had the responsibility of telling the court that the court failed to rule. So the court denied Greg’s appeal as “untimely.” This was around 2013. Since then, his case has not moved. Every day in solitary confinement is one too many, and every day in prison is one too many for Greg and the other people who have been cheated out of their lives by corrupt and uncaring state/court officials.

What you can do to help:
You are much needed as a supporter in any way you can deem useful: for instance, writing Greg to keep his spirit up, and/or spreading the word (we have flyers, websites) about the injustices done in the aftermath of the Lucasville prison disturbance, are simple ways to help.

You can contact Greg Curry at any of the below to learn more, support, correspond, help out, etc.:

Greg Curry, #213-159
OSP
878 Coitsville-Hubbard Road,
Youngstown, Ohio 44505
U.S.A.

You can also go to Jpay.com and write him via an email-system.

Useful websites:

Gregcurry.org

Ourfight4justice.wordpress.com

Page by supporters on facebook: www.facebook.com/greg.curry.370

Zine about Greg

Greg’s Flyer

For further information on the Lucasville prison uprising of 1993 and its aftermath:

Prisonersolidarity.org

Keithlamar.org

Georgeskatzes.org

Jasonrobb.org

Lucasvilleamnesty.org

Lucasvillejustice.wordpress.com

Kunta Kenyatta was in the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville on the other side from where the riot took place. He knows the innocent people who were falsely indicted after the riot and he knows what the environment and the mood was like before the uprising and disturbance. Kunta has been active in prisoner support; he was released years ago and has successfully rebuilt his life, which still includes supporting prisoners. He lives and works in Ohio.

Annabelle Parker is a prisoner advocate, permaculturist and (web)editor.

Conference: Lucasville prison uprising re-examined: 20 years on (April 2013)

03/27/2013
 
Three Day Conference Re-Examines 1993 Prison Uprising

What:     Re-Examining Lucasville Conference

When:    Friday, April 19, 7 to 9 pm

             Saturday April 20, 9 am to 10 pm   
         
            Sunday April 21, 9 am to 12 noon
Where:  Columbus State Community College, OHIO
             Location on Campus to Be Determined

Contact: Ben Turk              RedBirdPrisonAbolition@gmail.com
             614 704 4699
Web:    Re-ExaminingLucasville.org

Cost:     Suggested donation, $10-50- no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Three Day Conference Re-Examines 1993 Prison Uprising

Twenty years after one of the longest prison uprisings in US history, legal experts, historians and activists will gather to expose injustices resulting in death sentences for five men and lengthy prison terms for many others. The Re-Examining Lucasville Conference will explore the context in which the uprising occurred and present a comprehensive examination of what happened during the Uprising from April 11-21, 1993 at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility (SOCF) in Lucasville, Ohio and the legal proceedings that followed. During this eleven day uprising, ten people lost their lives before the prisoners were able to negotiate a peaceful surrender to state authorities. The State of Ohio promptly violated key parts of that agreement and targetted certain prisoners for prosecution.

The event will begin Friday night with the screening of a short documentary film by Derrick Jones, including footage from the uprising and interviews with activists and government officials. This includes an interview with then state prosecutor Daniel Hogan, who admits he does not know and thinks they will never know who actually killed hostage Officer Vallandingham, a crime for which he and other prosecutors sent four men to death row.

Attendees will then hear from some of those men and from others who have been held in solitary confinement since the uprising. Jason Robb, Siddique Abdullah Hasan, Bomani Shakur (also known as Keith Lamar) and Greg Curry will speak from the Ohio State Penitentiary (OSP) on Friday night.

On Saturday, the conference will dig into a close examination of the uprising. Men who were incarcerated at SOCF in April of 1993 will share their stories. Prominent Ohio lawyers and other experts will unfold the layers of injustice the State of Ohio engaged in to secure convictions following the uprising. Advocates and experts from across the US will connect the Lucasville Uprising with nationwide prison issues. 

– Attorney Mark Donatelli, who represented defendants after the New Mexico prison uprising in 1980, will discuss  the horrendous conditions that preceded the disturbance and contributed to successful plea negotiations.
– Attorney Niki Schwartz, who represented prisoners in concluding a peaceful settlement of the Lucasville uprising, will speak about the prosecution’s failure to abide by some of its most important provisions.
– Attorney Rick Kerger, who represented Siddique Abdullah Hasan in state court until taken off the case by the trial court judge, will speak about the struggle to provide unbiased and effective representation for  individual defendants.

– Attorney Phyllis Crocker, dean at the Cleveland Marshall Law School, chairperson of the 2007 Ohio Death Penalty Assessment Team of the American Bar Association, and currently serving on the task force appointed by the Ohio Supreme Court to examine the death penalty, will describe the changing scene with regard to the death penalty in Ohio.

On Sunday, attendees will participate in an interactive strategy session and will be invited to take action, joining the struggle for the Lucasville Uprising Prisoners. Conference organizers believe that a critical examination of the Lucasville Uprising will expose deeply unjust and inhumane practices that the Ohio prison system continues to engage in today. The Lucasville Uprising Prisoners continue to fight these injustices, and they hope the conference will broaden support, not only for their struggle, but for the struggles of all Ohioans who are targeted by this system.

Media representatives who would like to interview conference organizers or prisoners should contact Ben Turk at 614-704-4699 or insurgent.ben@gmail.com. More information about the uprising, including radio interviews with some of the prisoners can be found online at LucasvilleAmnesty.org.
See full schedule below for details.

RE-EXAMINING LUCASVILLE SCHEDULE  Friday, April 19, 7 to 9:30 p.m., Chairperson, Bob Fitrakis  Welcome Derrick Jones, documentary film, The Great Incarcerator: Part 2, The Shadow of Lucasville Lucasville Uprising Prisoners speak.

Saturday, April 20, 9 to noon, Chairperson, Alice Lynd 9:00 – 9:55 a.m., two skits drawn from transcripts: The Making of a Snitch,” Highway Patrol interview with man who became an informant; “The Death-Qualified Jury,” exclusion of potential jurors 10:00 – 10:55 a.m., Survivors of Lucasville, Conditions at Lucasville before the Uprising 11:00 a.m. – noon, Struggle in the Courts Attorney Vicki Werneke, Capital Habeas Unit, Federal Public Defender, on complicity and obstacles in habeas representation Staughton Lynd, attorney and author of Lucasville: The Untold Story of a Prison Uprising Saturday, April 20, noon to 1 p.m., Lunch, to be provided.

Saturday, April 20, 1 to 3 p.m., Layers of Injustice, Chairperson, Staughton Lynd Attorney Mark Donatelli, represented defendants after New Mexico prison uprising Attorney Niki Schwartz, represented prisoners in Lucasville negotiations Attorney Rick Kerger, represented Hasan in state court until taken off case by trial court judge Dean Phyllis Crocker, Cleveland Marshall Law School, chaired ABA panel on death penalty in Ohio, member of task force appointed by Ohio Supreme Court to examine death penalty.

Saturday, April 20, 3 to 5 p.m., breakout sessions Bonnie Kerness and Ojore Lutalo, art work and video “Sneak Peek” on isolation as a political tool in New Jersey prison Central Ohio Prisoner Advocates (COPA) and Redbird Prison Abolition, current conditions in Ohio prisons Others to be announced Saturday, April 20, 7 to 9:30 p.m. Derrick Jones, documentary film, The Great Incarcerator:  Part 1, Dark Little Secrets Entertainment Open Mic Poetry and Music.

Sunday, April 21, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, Building Support, Chairperson, Ben Turk Noelle Hanrahan, Prison Radio:  Mumia Abu Jamal support campaign Wide-ranging discussion about strategy and possible future actions                                         #   #   #