lawsuits

Fundraiser: Help Greg receive a fair and impartial Hearing!

Banner for Greg Curry Justice fundraiserGreg, Annabelle and Mosi hereby launch the Legal Trustfund for our Campaign to get Justice for Greg Curry.
Offline donations are welcome too! Plz contact us (see below).

Greg Curry’s cause is pure and simple justice: a fair, impartial hearing which is long overdue.

The money we raise will be used for investigative work and legal representation by an attorney.

The expenses, the filing decisions will all be posted.

The fund will be held in a Trust-account.

Numerous times Greg attemted to receive justice by filing pro-se motions with help of jailhouse lawyers. The proper judicial arguments are present in his case, but those legalities must be brought before the Court by an experienced attorney.

This is why Greg seeks your help, the help from the people who care to see justice-for-all be a reality for all.

Large or small donations all help, as well as recommending to others you know make a donation, or that attorneys donate their time. You can also make a donation via other means than this (contact us via this or email or facebook, see below) we will then add it to the “offline contributions.”

Kunta Kenyatta interviews Greg Curry:
https://gregcurry.wordpress.com/2016/04/11/injustice-continues-23-years-after-the-lucasville-prison-uprising-april-11-22nd-1993-interview-with-greg-curry-about-the-aftermath/

Contact:
Gregcurry.org
Email: freegregcurry@gmail.com
Facebook.com/freegregcurry
Twitter: @Freegregcurry

To donate, please visit: https://fundrazr.com/GregCurryLegalFund

 

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ACLU Case: We filed this suit because the ODRC is violating the First Amendment rights of the prisoners and of the press

This is about the ACLU Media-access case, in which Greg Curry also is a plaintiff, from the ACLU Ohio website:

21 years after the Lucasville prison uprising, the media is still waiting for face-to-face interviews with the condemned prisoners.

For more than two decades, Siddique Hasan, Jason Robb, George Skatzes, Keith LaMar and Greg Curry have claimed they are innocent of the crimes attributed to them during the 1993 prison uprising at Southern Ohio Correctional Facility (SOCF).

Among other things, these five men accuse the state of coercing false testimony from other SOCF prisoners in order to convict them. They have spent years in solitary confinement, soliciting media attention in an attempt to convince the public—and ultimately the court system—that they do not belong where they are.

In response, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (ODRC) has completely banned face-to-face media contact with these men, arguing that they are too much of a security risk to be allowed to tell their stories in person.

In late 2013, the ACLU of Ohio filed a lawsuit challenging this ban. The suit was filed on behalf of Hasan, Robb, Skatzes, LaMar and Curry, as well as one teacher and four reporters, including Pulitzer Prize winner Chris Hedges. 

We filed this suit because the ODRC is violating the First Amendment rights of the prisoners and of the press. It’s not hard to see that their actions have very little to do with security and everything to do with silencing an uncomfortable conversation about the Lucasville uprising.

For proof, consider that many other death row inmates in Ohio have been granted face-to-face access to the media. They include spree killer John Fautenberry, neo-Nazi murderer Frank Spisak, and convicted arsonist Kenneth Richey, who has since been released from death row.

In all, Ohio prison officials have approved nearly two dozen media interviews with other death row inmates while denying each and every request for face-to-face interviews with the five Lucasville prisoners. This ban is a special form of extended vengeance, reserved only for them.

These prisoners are complicated characters, and the Lucasville uprising is a complex story.

Hiding these complexities behind a wall of censorship will not make them go away.
The Basics

21 years ago, on Easter Sunday 1993, more than 400 inmates at an overcrowded prison in Lucasville, Ohio staged an 11-day prison uprising. In the ensuing violence, nine inmates and one corrections officer lost their lives.

The Basics – read more here.

(clockwise from top left) Jason Robb, Siddique Hasan, Greg Curry and Keith LaMar are all incarcerated at Ohio State Penitentiary in Youngstown, Ohio. Not pictured is George Skatzes, who is incarnated at the Chillicothe Correctional Institution (photo courtesy of Siddique Hasan and Greg Curry).

Artist Laurel Herbold’s imagined rendering of an actual legal meeting between prisoner Jason Robb, former ACLU of Ohio Legal Director James Hardiman, prisoner Greg Curry, ACLU Volunteer Attorneys Alice and Staughton Lynd, prisoner Siddique Hasan, ACLU of Ohio Managing Attorney Freda Levenson and prisoner Keith LaMar.